2011 Corruption Index Of African Countries – Transparency International

Transparency International’s 2011 Corruption Perceptions Index, CPI, scores countries on a scale of zero to 10, the higher the scores the lower the country’s level of corruption. Unstable governments, often with a legacy of conflict, continue to dominate the bottom rungs of the CPI.

The following can be deducted from the TI report on African corruption scale (the higher the scores the lower the country’s level of corruption):

The 2011 least corrupt country in Africa is Botswana
, a Southern African country, with scores of 6.1 points.

In West Africa, the least corrupt country is Cape Verde with scores of 5.5 points, while the most corrupt is Guinea with scores of 2.1 points.

The scores of other West African countries are listed below:

Benin: 3.0, Burkina Faso: 3.0, Ivory Coast: 2.2, Cape Verde: 5.5, Gambia: 3.5, Ghana: 3.9, Guinea: 2.1, Guinea-Bissau: 2.2, Liberia: 3.2, Mali: 2.8, Mauritania: 2.4, Niger: 2.5, Nigeria: 2.4, Senegal: 2.9, Sierra Leone: 2.5, Togo: 2.4.

In East Africa, the least corrupt country is Mauritius with scores of 5.1 points, followed by Rwanda with 5.0 points, while the most corrupt is Sudan with 1.6 points.

The scores of other East African countries are listed below:

Tanzania: 3.0, Kenya: 2.2, Uganda: 2.4, Rwanda: 5.0, Burundi: 1.9, Djibouti: 3.0, Eritrea: 2.5, Ethiopia: 2.7, Somalia: 1.0, Mozambique: 2.7, Madagascar: 3.0, Malawi: 3.0, Zambia: 3.2, Zimbabwe: 2.2, Comoros: 2.4, Mauritius: 5.1, Seychelles: 4.8, Sudan: 1.6.

In North Africa, the least corrupt country is Tunisia with scores of 3.8 points while the most corrupt is South Sudan with scores of 1.6.

The scores of other North African countries are listed below:

Algeria: 2.9, Egypt: 2.9, Libya: 2.0, Morocco: 3.4, South Sudan: 1.6, Tunisia: 3.8.

In Middle Africa, the least corrupt country is Gabon and Sao Tome and Principe with scores of 3.0 points while the most corrupt are Chad and DR Congo with scores of 2.0.

The scores of other Middle African countries are listed below:

Cameroon: 2.5, The Central African Republic: 2.2, Chad: 2.0, Gabon: 3.0, Sao Tome and Principe: 3.0.

In Southern Africa, the least corrupt is Botswana, with scores of 6.1 points.

The scores of other South African countries are listed below:

Angola: 2.0, DR Congo: 2.0, Lesotho: 3.5, Madagascar: 3.0, Malawi:3.0, Mauritius: 5.1, Mozambique: 2.7, Namibia: 4.4, South Africa: 4.1, Swaziland: 3.1, Tanzania: 3.0, Zambia: 3.2, Zimbabwe: 2.2.

The scores of Sub-Saharan African countries are listed below:

Togo: 2.4, Sierra Leone: 2.5, Senegal: 2.9.

This year, two thirds of all countries (global) covered by the index were given scores less than 5 – which means they are considered significantly corrupt.

Unstable governments, often with a legacy of conflict, continue to dominate the bottom rungs of the CPI. Afghanistan and Myanmar share second to last place with a score of 1.5, with Somalia and North Korea – measured for the first time – coming in last with a score of 1.

The report coincides with the observance of today’s World Anti-Corruption Day which also reveal that 80 percent or 5.6 billion human beings worldwide live under corrupt governments.

Transparency International based its tables on the populations of the assessed countries in 2011 CPI and came to the horrific realization that Planet Earth remains a highly inequitable place.

The report is not a verdict on the levels of corruption of societies – it is an assessment of administrative and political corruption only. The report is based on “perceptions”, but it is far more accurate and scientific than what that vague term would normally suggest.

Corruption is illegal and rather difficult to assess on the basis of hard empirical data. The methodology used in compiling comparable country data for the report involves capturing perceptions of those in a position to offer expert assessments of public sector corruption in a given country.

The world’s most peaceful countries score the best. In the 2011 CPI, New Zealand is top with a score of 9.5, followed by Denmark, Finland, Sweden and Singapore, the report notes.

Wealth seems no easy antidote to corruption: some relatively rich countries, including Russia, fall at the bottom of the global league table. Meanwhile, some of the world’s poorer states do comparatively well: Botswana, Bhutan, Cape Verde, and Rwanda all appear among the 50 “cleanest” countries.

The Index, which is closely watched by investors, economists, and civil society campaigners, is based on expert assessments and data from 17 surveys from 13 independent institutions, covering issues such as access to information, bribery of public officials, kickbacks in public procurement, and the enforcement of anti-corruption laws. While critics note that measuring perceptions of corruption is not the same as measuring corruption itself, the latter is almost impossible to do – as the corrupt are usually keen to cover up their tracks, hard data on graft and bribery is notoriously difficult to come by.

Culled from theguardian

  1. David Kanekey Conteh Reply

    Take note of the scores for the East African countries: Sudan with a score of 1.6 should not be considered the most corrupt, while Somalia has a score of 1.0. Please correct that. Thanks

  2. David Kanekey Conteh Reply

    Can you please clearly indicate why neighbouring Liberia should score very high than Sierra Leone?

  3. ednora aggrey Reply

    Please check between liberia and sierra leone ……… Because freetown is more corrupt than monrovia

  4. Gordon Reply

    cameroon should still be first

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