I Can’t See PDP Winning An Election Unless Nigerians Are Insane – Says Tinubu In Washington DC (PHOTOS)

By Adeola Fayehun

Former governor of Lagos state and influential member of the Action Congress of Nigeria, ACN, party, on Wednesday said “I can’t see PDP winning an election unless Nigerians are insane.”

SROLL DOWN FOR MORE…

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu in DC

Tinubu In DC

Tinubu In DC

Tinubu In DC

Asiwaju Bola Ahmed Tinubu In Washington DC in 2012

 

Former governor of Lagos state and influential member of the Action Congress of Nigeria, ACN, party, on Wednesday said “I can’t see PDP winning an election unless Nigerians are insane.”

Speaking in Washington DC at Woodrow Wilson International Center For Scholars, he further said:

“For the majority of Nigerians, the economy functions as an obstacle not an ally. Government claims that Nigeria enjoys the world’s third fastest growing economy with annual GDP growth of roughly 7 percent. This handsome figure contrasts with the unattractive lives most people endure. Income inequality is among the worst in the world. A higher percentage of Nigerians now wallow in abject poverty since the ruling party came to power. With insecurity escalating across large swaths of the land, electricity generation at a miserable 4,000 MGWs for an entire nation of over 150 million people, the collapse of the manufacturing industry and spiraling unemployment figures of youths and college graduates, it is difficult to take the GDP figure at face value.”

“The Nigerian government finds it convenient to lie. If by happenstance the GDP approximates the truth, it means super-elite within the elite benefits enormously while the rest of the nation suffers. True national prosperity cannot be founded on such a top-heavy architecture. Most Nigerians believe their lives are much harder now more than 13 years ago and getting worse. The hope that people still have about the future has nothing to do with the quality of government economic policy. It is mostly due to an innate sense of optimism that is a uniquely Nigerian trait which defies the normal standards of logic. It is one of the things that keeps Nigeria afloat though so many things say it should have already drowned.”

“The picture I have painted is stark but accurate, harsh but not hopeless. If I thought things were beyond hope, I would pursue another vocation. I am glued to this path because I believe a democratic, responsive government can improve Nigeria. However, if it persists along current policy lines, the federal government will resolve nothing and will preside over a worsening state.”

“I do not claim the opposition to be a choir of angels. We are not. Not all who call themselves to be opposition politicians are bona fide democrats. There is a principled opposition and an opportunistic one. Some are disgruntled elements of the current regime who have slipped into the opposition for a chance to settle personal scores or to advance personal ambitions through a different route. These people are opposition in name only; in reality, they are but the photographic negative of the status quo they purport to oppose.”

“Nor do I believe those in power are evil incarnate. Some are decent people. However, the governing system they have created and the dominant values under which that system operates extinguishes these people’s finer qualities. The overriding concern of the PDP political community is to retain power, not to advance the public welfare. With all our gaps and imperfections, the opposition is possessed of greater civic purpose and has in mind substantive policies qualitatively better than the toxin the current government is brewing.”

“In the rest of this address, I will contrast the policies of my party, the Action Congress of Nigeria, with those of government. You will see that we have significantly different visions. The problem with our current rulers is not that they don’t love Nigeria. They love the concept of Nigeria well enough. The real problem is that they care little for the average Nigerian.”

Leave a Reply